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17,95 €

Tres Haikei y más
Obras para koto y flauta de pico


REF.: NEOS 11010
EAN 13: 4260063110108
Si realiza el pedido hoy, este producto estará listo para ser enviado el lunes 17/08/2020


FECHA DE PUBLICACIÓN
29/03/2012

INTÉRPRETES

Makiko Goto, koto
13-string koto [01] · [08] · [11]
21-string koto [06] · [09]
bass koto [02] · [10] · [05]

Jeremias Schwarzer, flauta de pico
tenor recorder after Ganassi (a=466 Hz) by Ernst Meyer, Paris [01] · [08] · [07]
voice flute after Bressan (a=415 Hz) by Fred Morgan, Australia [06]
voice flute after Bressan (a=392 Hz) by Ernst Meyer, Paris [02] · [03] · [11]
soprano recorder after early Baroque models (a=440 Hz) by Andreas Schwob, Switzerland [02] · [05]
bass recorder by Yamaha [02]
great bass recorder by Herbert Paetzold, Germany [04] · [05]



CONTENIDO

Erwin Koch-Raphael (*1949)
[01] Composition No. 60 “shogo/noonday” I for recorder and koto (2005) 02:13

Annette Schlünz (*1964)
[02]  Light from the one for recorder and 17-string bass koto (2006) 12:10

Yatsuhashi Kengyô (1614–1685)
[03] Rokudan no Shirabe for recorder and koto 05:34

Dokyoku School
[04] Yamagoe (traditional, 13th century) arr. for recorder solo by Jeremias Schwarzer 05:01

Yuji Takahashi (*1938)
[05] koto nado asobi version for koto, recorder and shamisen (2000) 06:19

Misato Mochizuki (*1969)
[06] Toccata for recorder and 21-string koto (2005) 07:32

Dokyoku School
[07] Daha (traditional, 13th century) arr. for recorder solo by Jeremias Schwarzer 03:54

Erwin Koch-Raphael (*1949)
[08] Composition No. 60 “shogo/noonday” II & III for koto (2005) 02:31

Yuji Takahashi (*1938)
[09] recorder nado asobi version for recorder, bass koto and 21-string koto (2000)  06:35

Toshio Hosokawa (*1955)
[10] Nocturne for bass koto (1982) 09:56
[11] Schneeglöckchen for recorder and koto (2009) 08:20

1 CD - DDD - 70'06''


RESEÑA (La Quinta de Mahler)

THREE HAIKEI AND MORE
Music for recorder and koto

What does ‘modern’ music sound like in the age of global awareness? This is the question taken up by three haikei and more, using examples from traditional music and new works based on the Japanese musical tradition.

The koto (the Japanese zither) originally arrived in Japan by way of China in the Nara period (8th century) as an instrument in the gagaku ensemble. Later it evolved into a solo instrument whose most important traditional reper-toire was provided by Yatsuhashi Kengyô in the 17th century.

At the same time as the koto, the recorder had its music-historical heyday in the Baroque age of the 17th and early 18th centuries. During the 20th century, in the wake of the early music movement, it became a concert instrument for which contemporary composers have written an increasingly large number of works.

The koto and the recorder can be found in both the folk and the art music of their respective cultures. The composers commissioned to write new works for Makiko Goto and Jeremias Schwarzer were thus able to draw their material from many and varied realms of musical association.

The project three haikei and more was supported by commissions from Deutschlandfunk (Forum Neue Musik 2006) and the Ernst von Siemens Music Foundation (Grant-in-aid, 2005). The results could hardly have been more different. No less unusual is the relation to Japanese traditional music: not one of the pieces is performed in its ‘original’ instrumentation.

Even when the ancient Japanese Zen pieces Daha and Yamagoe are played on a recorder, their sounds differ so markedly from the tones of the shakuhachi (the Japanese bamboo flute) that the performances seem to come from a different tradition altogether. Nevertheless, the character of the pieces is retained – a musical expression of mental states or way-stations on a spiritual journey (Yamagoe means ‘a walk over the mountain’, a symbol of difficulties to be overcome, while Daha symbolizes the self-discipline necessary to this end).

Rokudan no Shirabe (Music of six steps) by Yatsuhashi Kengyô (1614–1685) is heard here in an abridged version. While the original escalates from a placid opening to a fast concluding section, our version consists of the consecutive sections I, IV and VI, which add more variety to the music through the clearly audible increase in tempo.

Erwin Koch-Raphael (b. 1949) and Toshio Hosokawa (b. 1955) both studied with Isang Yun in Berlin, and both explicitly relate their works on our CD to the musical language of Japan. While Hosokawa creates a piece of modern ritual music in his early Nocturne (1982), Schneeglöckchen (Snowdrops, 2009) emerges from organic musical germ-cells that evolve by circling a few central pitches only to descend again into silence. For Hosokawa, the title refers not only to the first flowers of spring, but to the enormous strength that the plant expends in order to burst through the frozen ground of winter into the outside world.

Koch-Raphael’s multi-sectional duo shogo/noonday (2005) is perhaps the most ‘Asian-sounding’ piece on our CD. Here the silence between the sounds is specially pronounced, comparable in its way to the principles of a Japanese garden.

Misato Mochizuki (b. 1969) writes modern music without the burden of cultural significance – energetic and vibrant, almost always with a pulsating rhythm. She employs ‘Western’ and ‘Asian’ instruments as soundboards, eavesdropping on the vitality within them.

Annette Schlünz (b. 1964) achieves something ‘Asian’ in many of her pieces. Her musical ‘particles’, though meagre when taken by themselves, are transformed into energetic germ-cells that seem to lead lives of their own. It is not the elements she employs that evoke this vitality, but her style of composition.

Yuji Takahashi (b. 1938), in his conceptual piece koto nado asobi, probes various ways that a soloist can be accompanied and supported by one or more fellow-musicians. In recorder nado asobi the relations are inverted: the main focus now falls on the sound of the recorder.

In both versions on our recording the various koto instruments and the placement of the musicians in space were chosen so that a physical path always had to be traversed between the various sonic events – a path made audible by surround sound.

Jeremias Schwarzer
Translation: J. Bradford Robinson

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