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16,95 €

Friedrich Cerha
Música de cámara con clarinete


REF.: NEOS 10921
EAN 13: 4260063109218
24 horas: Si realiza el pedido hoy, este producto estará listo para ser enviado el jueves 12/12/2019


FECHA DE PUBLICACIÓN
29/03/2012

INTÉRPRETES
Andreas Schablas, clarinete
Janna Polyzoides, piano
Arcus Ensemble Wien
Hugo Wolff Quartett


CONTENIDO

Friedrich Cerha (1926):

Five Pieces for Clarinet, Cello and Piano (2000) 17:14

[01] I Sehr ruhig 03:18
[02] II [Viertel=108] 02:28
[03] III [Viertel = 46] 03:07
[04] IV Heftig 02:13
[05] V ruhig 06:08

Arcus Ensemble Wien
Andreas Schablas, clarinet
Erich Oskar Huetter, cello
Janna Polyzoides, piano

Eight Bagatelles for Clarinet and Piano (2009) 15:46

[06] I Schwerblütig 02:18
[07] II Heftig 00:53
[08] III Sehr frei 02:36
[09] IV Heiter 00:57
[10] V Ungestüm 00:48
[11] VI Klezmeriana 03:53
[12] VII Wütend 00:58
[13] VIII Abgesang 03:23

Andreas Schablas, clarinet
Janna Polyzoides, piano

Quintet for Clarinet and String Quartet (2004) 21:36

[14] I Stürmisch 05:09
[15] II Sehr ruhig 08:32
[16] III Intermezzo 02:58
[17] IV Energico 04:57

Andreas Schablas, clarinet
Hugo Wolf Quartett
Sebastian Gürtler, violin
Régis Bringolf, violin
Gertrud Weinmeister, viola
Florian Berner, cello

1 CD - DDD - 54'45''


RESEÑA (La Quinta de Mahler)

La obra penúltima de los que fueron protagonistas de las post-vanguardias nos suele servir para valorar cómo el paso del tiempo ha dado y quitado razones. La producción del octogenario Friedrich Cerha es una buena muestra de cómo el afán o necesidad de comunicación se ha hecho perentoria subrayando la frase de Barce: “… hasta ahora hemos sido ocurrentes e ingeniosos. Ahora tendremos que escribir música…”.

El sello Neos se acerca por segunda vez al universo Cerha, curiosamente en ambas ocasiones a su obra camerística compuesta en los extremos de su vida creativa. Vaya por delante que esta grabación se saborea con deleite e interés dejando en cada nueva revisión un regusto a obra grande, a ecos de música impecable y magnética. Las tres piezas que cubren el registro tienen al clarinete como hilo conductor en confrontación con diversos grupos. La interacción del clarinete –amor confesado del austríaco– con instrumentos de cuerda (cello, piano o cuarteto) es uno de los problemas que Cehra se plantea resolver y lo hace con la naturalidad de un creador de técnica imponente, control formal, dueño de un sonido ágil y articulado, que Andreas Schablas sirve de forma excepcional.

Sin duda el Quinteto (2004) es la gran estrella del disco, una obra de empaque y luz que evoluciona desde planteamientos estructurales clásicos pero que no renuncia a las conquistas del pasado reciente; aunque no es menos cierto que las Cinco piezas (2000) y las recientes Ocho bagatelas (2009) son capaces de generar organismos complejos cuya relación emocional atrapa desde el principio. Gran ocasión para acercarse a Cerha antes de su Carta Blanca madrileña y disfrutar de uno de esos compositores por derecho capaces de generar arte con la simple espontaneidad del gesto.

Juan Francisco de Dios

 

György Ligeti once claimed that he was not a minimalist, but a maximalist. It is thus no coincidence that this rigorous genius had a high opinion of his fellow-composer Friedrich Cerha. Nor is it a coincidence that Ligeti called him a “master of Viennese understatement”.

Cerha, too, embraced his art with the uncompromising earnestness that has always distinguished the Viennese avant-garde, particularly in his confrontation with the city’s intrigue-ridden traditionalism. Yet he has no magnetic flair, being neither an artistic missionary nor an unalloyed genius of the German stamp. Instead, his music is typified by a subliminal, proliferating web of musical events, uninhibited in the Viennese manner and thoroughly profound, but of intransigent radicality …

The urge to say what one has to say is incompatible with subjection to aesthetic dogmas or tried-and-tested strategies of applied symbolism. In this sense Cerha is unclassifiable …In the late 1950s, at the same time as Ligeti, Xenakis and Lutoslawski, he developed his own approach to composing with sound-surfaces and textures, as in his exorbitantly difficult orchestral cycle Spiegel (1960/61). Later pieces, above all his operas Baal, Der Rattenfänger and Der Riese vom Steinfeld, contain tonal and melodic elements that have often drawn comparisons with Alban Berg. At times, however, Cerha’s completion of Berg’s opera Lulu has caused his music to be pigeonholed in a way that does blatant injustice to its individuality.

Cerha was never concerned with multicoloured eclecticism, still less with aesthetic concessions. On the contrary, his concern was to square the circle that constitutes a basic problem of contemporary music: how to address the listener as forthrightly as possible with the linguistic means available to compositionally sophisticated music, and thereby to combine structure and expression with organic evolution.

Julia Spinola


Chamber Music with Clarinet

After making a thorough study of neo-classicism, the Viennese School and serialism, I developed, in my orchestral cycle Spiegel (1960/61), a musical language which was completely devoid of traditional formulations, but which differed from contemporary efforts by Ligeti, Xenakis or Scelsi in its high degree of emotionally accessible evolutionary processes.

It was thus connected to a certain extent with my musical roots, though without sharing their material. But by the time of my ensemble piece Exercises (1962–67) I had begun to allow purist structures to interact with ‘regressions’ clearly related to various linguistic idioms from our European tradition. Not wanting to dispense with qualities I love, I sought to recover them one step at a time. In my opera Baal (premiered in 1981) I finally succeeded in seamlessly weaving all my previous experiences into a single musical organism.

Between this work and the chamber music on this CD came further ‘excursions’ into territory outside my ken, including my study of non-European music. My post-2000 works likewise belong to creative periods with various centres of gravity.

Five Pieces for Clarinet, Cello and Piano (2000)

It was Heinrich Schiff who suggested that I think up something for clarinet, cello and piano because musicians were hungering for a piece to play between the two standard works by Beethoven and Brahms. It took me a while before I finally lit on Five Pieces as a tribute to his 50th birthday.

The pieces are not simply juxtaposed, but form a unified cycle. The sequence of movements departs from the conventional pattern in that the final piece, which opens with a pianissimo clarinet line accompanied by a repeated snippet of dolorous glissando, is very slow. The likewise very calm first movement has slow passages of octaves in the piano accompanied by an abrupt ff snippet, while the gloomy third piece gathers two other rapid flurries into a sort of forte chorale that also occurs twice in the final movement.

The second piece, a scampering pianissimo presto, and the violent fourth piece make use of various complementary polyrhythmic formations. There are thus direct and less direct degrees of similarity before the work, having entered a plodding quarter-note motion barely related to its opening bars, embraces all the instruments and rises to triple forte only to fade away in the reverberations of its final chord.

Eight Bagatelles for Clarinet and Piano (2009)

Over the last few years I have developed an aversion to monomaniacal note-spinning, to the ‘fabricated’ spread of musical ideas. At the same time I have attached increasing importance to spontaneity of gesture, to the ‘flash’ of intuition and to formulations of maximum terseness and concision. This has led not only to small-scale structures within larger works, as in my orchestral pieces Momente and Instants, but also to the creation of forms of chamber-like brevity, such as Bagatelles for String Trio and two similar cycles, one for clarinet and another for flute and piano.

My concern in these pieces was to create sharply etched and highly contrasting characters while producing a convincing dramaturgy in the temporal progression and recognizable relations in the material. Unlike my miniatures for string trio, the Bagatelles for Clarinet have fairly strong allusions to folk music. I had taken a renewed interest in klezmer music, whose melodies had been familiar to me since the 1950s. It undoubtedly influenced me in the third piece (for solo clarinet) and in the sixth piece, which is headed ‘Klezmeriana’.

The impetus for the fourth, fifth and seventh bagatelles was provided by several piano pieces from my study of Slavic music based on my childhood experiences. In the second bagatelle the relation between the instruments amounts to a veritable tug-of-war; the fourth describes a cautious rapprochement; and the fifth toys playfully with split sonorities. The titles refer to the music’s prevailing mood. When writing it, of course, I had in the back of my mind the noble clarinet tone of Andreas Schablas, who has played all my works for this instrument many times.

Quintet for Clarinet and String Quartet (2004)

This piece is surely the most ‘classical’ work from this formative period in my career, a period which I already abandoned in the above-mentioned ‘moment forms’. When I received a commission to write a string quartet for BNP Paribas, however, I had for years been increasingly attracted by the thought of juxtaposing the characteristic timbral substance of a solo instrument with a collective, or of having them mutually interact. The result was a saxophone concerto, a violin concerto, the Clarinet Quintet, a piece for trombone and string quartet and an oboe quintet, composed since 2003. In the chamber pieces I was particularly attracted by the interaction between the distinctive character of a solo instrument and the especially homogeneous sound of a string quartet, though the timbral contrast is, of course, greater in the case of a trombone and oboe than in the Clarinet Quintet, which came first. My general love for the clarinet – a love I share with Mozart – and my memory of an especially delightful performance of his work in the same genre largely governed my choice of solo instrument. It did not directly influence my own piece, of course, but its manner of sonic interplay between clarinet and string quartet left me so enthralled that it continued to ferment in my imagination.
The characters of the four movements basically follow classical principles, but they are infinitely richer in changes of tempo and character (often extremely contrasting), in symmetries, in expanded or abbreviated variants of formal elements and in the complex ways that they interweave. The lyrical second movement has no allusions to Mozart, but it does allude to more or less early ideas of my own that I was not aware of at the time. Conversely, the middle of the scherzo-like third movement (Intermezzo) is deliberately related, in the form of a rhythmic game, to the final movement of a work I dearly love: Haydn’s Symphony No. 88.
Despite its many suggestions and reminiscences, the work, rather than being a pastiche, has a convincing formal progression. This is in keeping with a general concern that I have always pursued, no matter what my interests at the time: I want my music to come to grips in complex organisms with things we have experienced, or with things capable of being experienced at all today.

Friedrich Cerha
Translation: J. Bradford Robinson

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