buscar

Neos | INSTRUMENTOS | SIGLOS XX Y XXI | SINFONICA (1 CD)

Facebook Twitter

precio

16,95 €

Conciertos para saxofón
Glazunov, LeFanu y Meyer


REF.: NEOS 10910
EAN 13: 4260063109102
Si realiza el pedido hoy, este producto estará listo para ser enviado el lunes 09/12/2019


FECHA DE PUBLICACIÓN
29/03/2012

INTÉRPRETES
John-Edward Kelly, saxo alto
Netherlands Radio Chamber Philharmonic
John-Edward Kelly y Micha Hamel, directores


CONTENIDO

Alexandre Glazounov (1865–1936):

[01] Concerto for Alto Saxophone and String Orchestra (1934) 14:17

Cadenza: John-Edward Kelly
John-Edward Kelly, conductor & soloist


Nicola LeFanu (*1947):

[02] Concerto for Alto Saxophone and String Orchestra (1989) * 23:43
Dedicated to John-Edward Kelly

Micha Hamel, conductor

Krzysztof Meyer (*1943):

Concerto for Alto Saxophone and String Orchestra, op. 79 (1993) * 20:41
Dedicated to John-Edward Kelly
[03] I Quieto 11:40
[04] II Inquieto 09:01

Micha Hamel, conductor

* World Premiere Recordings

1 CD - DDD - 58'42''


RESEÑA (La Quinta de Mahler)

Obviando el amor a primera vista del jazz, la aceptación del saxofón como vehículo sonoro solvente ha sido compleja. Quizá la ausencia de grandes intérpretes ha motivado el retraimiento de los creadores más incrédulos. El extenso catálogo del sello Neos nos presenta un buen ejemplo de las posibilidades del saxo gracias a John-Edward Kelly, aquí director y solista en un disco de sonido cuidado e inquieto.

Dispuestos en orden cronológico, Glazunov, LeFanu y Meyer presentan una tríada de conciertos en los que descubrimos un instrumento rico en armónicos, dinámicas y largos vuelos. En su exilio parisino, Alexander Glazunov armó un concierto de ecos tardo-románticos y tímidos destellos neoclásicos donde sólo un incesante tránsito modulante habla de una obra de los años treinta. La labor de Kelly, al igual que con LeFanu, no se limita al saxo, sino que dirige con gusto al conjunto holandés añadiendo una actualización y una cadencia propia que singulariza la versión sobre la veintena de registros anteriores.

En primera grabación mundial se presentan los conciertos de la británica Nicola LeFanu y del polaco Krzysztof Meyer, obras que respiran un aire similar gracias al diálogo idiomático y a un trabajo tímbrico de solvencia. LeFanu presenta en su Concierto (1989) un juego de contraposición de módulos motívicos bien definidos y recurrentes donde el solista elabora líneas líricas con cuartos de tono. Por su parte, el Concierto op. 79 (1993) surge en el inicio del retorno al pasado de Meyer. Elogio de la economía temática, pasa de un estatismo ensimismado a un inquieto y eléctrico final de brillantes recursos que subrayan la validez de un instrumento que se ha hecho, gracias a músicos como Kelly, con un sitio en el imaginario sonoro actual.

Juan Francisco de Dios

 

Alexandre Glazounov · Concerto for Alto Saxophone and String Orchestra (1934)

The great Russian romantic Alexandre Glazounov (1865–1936) lived as a quasi-refugee near Paris when he was asked on December 15th, 1933 by my teacher Sigurd Rascher to write a saxophone concerto. Rascher had heard a performance of Glazounov’s Saxophone Quartet, op. 109 the previous evening, and felt confident that Glazounov would be interested. Glazounov himself did not expect to be enthusiastic: approached by Rascher the night before, he exclaimed, “Young man, I have known the saxophone for 50 years!” As he heard Rascher’s unique playing, however, he grew excited: “Yes, for such a musician I will write a concerto!” Distracted by both political complications and his obligations at the St. Petersburg Conservatory, Glazounov had composed relatively little in recent years, and his spontaneous decision to write a large work was remarkable.

A few weeks later, word reached Rascher in Copenhagen, where he lived in exile 1933–1938, that the concerto was nearly finished. He would soon travel to Paris again to view the score with the composer: among other things, they agreed upon specific tempi and a new cadenza. The world premiere took place on 26th November, 1934 in Nyköping, Sweden, with the Norrköping Symphony Orchestra conducted by Tord Benner and Sigurd Rascher as soloist. On the next day in Norrköping, Sweden, the Glazounov was performed again, this time together with the world premiere of the Saxophone Concerto by Lars-Erik Larsson.

Alexandre Glazounov’s Saxophone Concerto is easily the most famous work ever written for saxophone. It has also become the most frequently performed work of Glazounov, as, sadly, his large œuvre has fallen into neglect. Glazounov was neither a modernist nor a particularly fashionable composer, but rather a devout representative of Russian music in the tradition of Rimsky-Korsakov and – in the noblest sense – an exacting craftsman. Once considered the greatest musical talent of Russia, his remarkable musical abilities were legendary even during his lifetime (there are multiple references to these in Shosta-kovich’ autobiographical “Testament”). The Saxophone Concerto, too, is by no means a “progressive” work, but rather a delightful presentation of an instrument Glazounov obviously loved. He did as much as any other composer to help the saxophone become accepted as a concert instrument, and he has given the saxophone its only truly romantic concerto.

The concerto nonetheless suffered a complex birth. Mostly for political reasons, Glazounov had difficulty securing a publisher for the work, and he died before he could correct the printed edition. Consequently, it was published with many mistakes and dubious alterations in both the solo part and the orchestra. Among many other things, the concerto is referred to as “Op. 109” (like all Glazounov’s last four compositions, it was given no opus number; Op. 109 is the Saxophone Quartet); there are blatantly wrong notes and an obvious tempo misprint; and an editor at Editions Leduc, A. Petiot, was added to early printings as a “co-composer”. The latter is absurd, as Sigurd Rascher gave me the opportunity to learn the concerto from the complete score in Glazounov’s own handwriting, and there is no mention of Mr. Petiot. Although there is no reliable historical explanation, the theory that the name A. Petiot was added for copyright reasons due to the political situation of the day seems credible.

On the basis of Glazounov’s manuscript, I restored the score to its original state and have used this for the present recording. Glazounov agreed that Rascher should play his own cadenza, but I was never attracted to it. Rascher himself encouraged me to write my own cadenza, which is performed here.

Nicola LeFanu · Concerto for Alto Saxophone and String Orchestra (1989)

Nicola LeFanu (b. 1947) is the daughter of the composer Elizabeth Maconchy, a granddaughter of the legendary Irish Victorian writer Sheridan LeFanu and a former student of the very exceptional Egon Wellesz. Following studies at Oxford, the Royal College of Music, Harvard and Brandeis, she lived in London for many years, where she taught at King’s College together with her husband, Australian composer David Lumsdaine. From 1994–2008 she was Professor of Composition and Head of the Music Department and at the University of York. Her extensive œuvre of more some 100 compositions – including 7 operas – has been performed around the world, yet she continues to see composition as more of an inner passion than a profession.

Nicola LeFanu had already written at my request her extraordinary saxophone quartet, Moon over the Western Ridge, Mootwingee (1985) when I asked her in 1988 to write a saxophone concerto. As an opportunity arose to perform the premiere of the work in Finland with Juha Kangas and his fabulous Ostrobothnian Chamber Orchestra in January, 1990, the creative wheels moved quickly.

Nicola LeFanu has offered the following comments about her magical quarter-tone saxophone concerto: “My Concerto for Saxophone is a single movement work lasting about 20 minutes. It has a characteristic and unusual sound world, arising from its virtuosity (in the solo saxophone and the strings, too) and also because it employs quarter-tones throughout. The concerto is full of energy and colour; it is essentially a lyric piece, concerned with fantasy and reflection.

The work is shaped from a number of recurring ideas, making it a distant descendant of ritornello form. These ideas are juxtaposed and combined; they are never repeated exactly, but always return in transformation. This can be easily heard in the reappearance of the vigorous music which is played by the strings in unison. The chromatic harmony of the concerto is anchored in an underlying modality which surfaces at the quiet centre of the work and is glimpsed again in the coda.

If I try and find images for this piece, I think of the sea: turbulent, stormy, calm… I think of a soaring seabird, or seashell turned over and over by the ceaseless waves, turned even by the gentlest wave on a starlit night.

The concerto was commissioned by the Ostrobothnian Chamber Orchestra with funds provided by the Arts Council of Great Britain. It is dedicated to its remarkable soloist, John-Edward Kelly.”

Krzysztof Meyer · Concerto for Alto Saxophone and String Orchestra, op. 79 (1993)

Krzysztof Meyer (b. 1943) is widely respected for his great musical skills and his vast musical knowledge, yet his music remains for the most part an “insider tip”. Despite continuous international performances and a long list of devout supporters – whether renowned instrumentalists or famous composers such as his close friend, the late Witold Lutoslawski – his works have been somewhat overshadowed by those of the more renowned representatives of the Polish avant-garde. Undeterred, he has striven tirelessly to further develop his own deeply expressive musical language.

Born the son of a medical doctor in Krakow in 1943, Krzysztof Meyer’s studies ultimately led him to the composition classes of Stanislaw Wiechowicz and Krzysztof Penderecki in Krakow and to Nadia Boulanger in Paris. Along the way, he befriended Dmitri Shostakovich, becoming a renowned authority on his music and authoring one of the most respected Shostakovich biographies. He quickly established himself as an adept and beloved pedagogue, accepting professorships in Krakow and at the Hochschule für Musik in Cologne, Germany. He is married to the noted Polish musicologist Dr. Danuta Gwizdalanka and divides his time between Germany and Poland.

The Concerto for Alto Saxophone and String Orchestra was written at my request in 1992–93. The work consists of a lamenting, darkly-textured slow movement (‘Quieto’) and a seven-sectioned, starkly-contrasted fast movement (‘Inquieto’). A strikingly beautiful use of dissonances – characteristic of Meyer’s music in general – is central to the melodic and harmonic devices of both movements. Also typical for Krzysztof Meyer is the high degree of integration between the solo instrument and the orchestra: although the saxophone plays a leading musical role throughout, it remains embedded in the texture of the whole, with the orchestra never being subjugated to a secondary function. The use of the saxophone is remarkable, utilizing the high register with an unhindered virtuosity.

Although the concerto ultimately makes a dazzling impression along the way to its dramatic, final climax, it is also a work of carefully-sculpted, minute detail. The listener will notice the emotionally charged atmosphere created by Meyer’s deeply expressive harmonies, as well as to the pantomimic gestures inherent in even the slightest melodic motifs. Both of these aspects are defining qualities of Krzysztof Meyer’s special musical world.
The Concerto for Alto Saxophone and String Orchestra was premiered in Stuttgart with the Radio-Sinfonieorchester Stuttgart under Heinrich Schiff on 12 January 1994.

John-Edward Kelly
January, 2012
 

descuentos especiales

16,95 €

Neos
Conciertos para saxofón
Glazunov, LeFanu y Meyer

16,95 €

Neos
John Edward Kelly...
'Ein schneller Blick… ein kurzes Aufscheinen';...
33,90 €
32,21 €

16,95 €

Neos
Conciertos para saxofón
Glazunov, LeFanu y Meyer

16,95 €

Neos
John Edward Kelly...
'Ein schneller Blick… ein kurzes Aufscheinen';...

49,95 €

Audite
Sergiu Celibidache
Las grabaciones de Berlín [13 CDs]
83,85 €
75,47 €

+ del mismo compositor

13,95 €
Brilliant
Alexander Glazunov
Integral de Sinfonías
17,95 €
Orfeo
Alexander Glazunov
Sinfonías Nos. 1 & 5
49,95 €
Audite
Sergiu Celibidache
Las grabaciones de Berlín [13 CDs]

+ del mismo artista

16,95 €
Neos
John Edward Kelly...
'Ein schneller Blick… ein kurzes Aufscheinen';...

+ del mismo sello

16,95 €
Neos
René Wohlhauser
The Marakra Cycle
63,80 €
Neos
Bienal de Salzburgo
Festival para la Nueva Música 2009
17,95 €
Neos
Bruno Maderna
Integral de la obra orquestal, vol. 1
LA QUINTA DE MAHLER

Nuestro espacio

La Quinta de Mahler
Teléfonos:
91 8053899
91 8961480

Nuevo local
Galileo 46
28015 Madrid

Horario
Lunes a viernes
11:00-14:00
17:00-20:00
Sábados
11:00-14:00
Festivos cerrado